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Posts Tagged ‘tofu’

After a few hours of shopping at Kappabashi (restaurant supply and knife galore district) and a few more hours spent at ishimori (the #1 saxophone shop in japan) we met up with some friends for yakitori. Yakitori is marinated,grilled, everything you can dream of, on a stick. These pictures tell the rest…

kampai

fried octopus

scallions, peppers and yellow beans

squid legs

beef fat and onions

chicken meat balls and beef hearts

tofu

shiitake

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After a not so long, yet tiring day of walking around Kamakura and visiting the shrines and statues we came back home to the best meal I had in Tokyo so far. Sukiyaki is made by placing cast iron pot in the center of the table. Into the pot goes some fat…

as it renders you add some onions…

sake, sugar, soy sauce and some water.

The broth is now ready and we can start adding in the goods; tofu, shiitake, enokitake, greens, potato noodles, scallions and beef. Cook it all together and as you pick your food out of the pot you dip it in raw egg then eat it. It is so good!

I want to eat skuyaki everyday!!!!

As food come out of the pot and into our stomach fresh food goes into the broth, more and more and more until you think you are done, then, a little more and we are done.

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I’m in Tokyo and I can’t stop eating. Unfortunately my stomach is not as big as I sometimes wish it was… But don’t worry, luckily I’m accompanied by a man who loves food and for the most part always help me to finish my plate off.
For our first meal we had ramen in Ikebukuro, the noodles were served it a thick pork broth, with a mountain of scallions and a perfectly cooked egg. We didn’t know that Ikebukuro is famous for a certain type of ramen, where the noodles are served on the side and then dipped into the broth, oh no, it looks like we gonna have to eat ramen again…
So incredibly delicious…

Later that day we met up with our friends Emi and Bill for dinner in Asakusa, after a quick visit to Sensō-ji, a beautiful Buddhist temple, we walked down a street filled with small cozy eateries, and had Emi choose the spot for dinner. Let me just say, she did not do us wrong, The food was unreal.
We had some tofu in kimchi broth and slow cooked beef (both were cooked in a continuous broth – as they take soup out, they add stuff in, so you have a never-ending pot of goodness), asparagus and butter, seaweed and ginger salad, tuna sashimi and sapporo. a lot of sapporo.


Stay tuned, there is so much more to come..

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As the weather in NY drops below the freezing point, soups seems to be the only natural thing to eat.
I was told by my acupuncturist yesterday that I need to push out something that is still external , but may become internal if left untreated, and so I should eat a lot of Miso. According to Chinese tradition exterior diseases first affect the body surfaces that are exposed directly to the environment – the skin, the mucous membranes of the nose, throat, and lungs. The most prevalent exterior conditions are the common cold and flu, the sooner ones notices these conditions and take action, the more likely their interior progress can be reversed. Food that promotes sweating is recommended for treating such conditions – miso soup, ginger and peppermint tea are my favorite remedies.

Miso is a fermented soybean paste thought to have originated in China some 2,500 years ago. It is made by combining cooked soybeans, mold, salt and various grains and then fermenting them together for six months to two years. There are three basic types of miso: soybean, barley and rice, and 40-50 other varieties. Each type has its own distinctive color and flavor.
Healing properties of miso: 13%-20% protein; it is a live food containing lactobacillus (the same in yogurt) that aids in digestion; it creates an alkaline condition in the body promoting resistance against disease. According to tradition, miso promotes long life and good health.
In my miso soup I like using a lot of ginger and scallions, along with kombu, wakame, tofu and shiitake.
Kombu (kelp) –  moistens dryness; increases yin fluids; softens hardened areas and masses in the body; helps transform heat induced phlegm; benefits kidneys; diuretic; anti-coagulant effect on the blood; is a natural fungicide; relieves coughing and asthma; soothes the lungs and throat; eradicates fungal and candida yeast overgrowths.
Wakame
– diuretic; transforms and resolves phlegm; high in calcium; rich in niacin and thiamine; promotes healthy hair and skin; soften hardened tissue and masses; tonifies the yin fluids; used in Japanese tradition to purify the mother’s blood after childbirth.
Tofu – benefits the lungs and large intestine; relieves inflammation in the stomach; neutralizes toxins.
Shiitake

What a healthy, cold fighting soup this is going to be!
*most of this information is based on the book “healing with whole foods” by Paul Pritchard
Miso soup recipe
Ingredients:

  • 10-12 cups of chicken stock or water – I prefer using chicken stock, got to give grandma’s remedies some credit too.
  • about 2-3 tablespoons of dark miso
  • 1/4 cup dry Wakame, soaked in 2 cups of water
  • 1 big piece of Kombu, cut into small chunks (use scissors)
  • 1/2 pack of tofu, cut into 1 inch cubes
  • 1 tablespoon of bonito (or any other) dry fish flakes, optional
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • ginger, at least 3-5 inch long, peeled and sliced
  • 3-4 cloves of garlic, sliced
  • 1 bunch scallions, sliced
  • 10 shiitake mushrooms, leg removed, cut in 4

Directions:

  1. in a soup pot, sautee garlic onion and ginger for about 4-5 minutes
  2. add wakame and the liquid it was soaked in and stir
  3. add mushrooms, 3/4 of scallions, kombu, tofu, bonito fish flakes and chicken stock
  4. bring to a boil and reduce to simmer, cook for about 30 minutes
  5. add miso, stir and cook for 10 more minutes
  6. serve hot with fresh scallions on top
  7. optional addition: hard-boiled or fried egg is a delicious addition to this soup.

*Miso, Kombu, Wakame and Bonito flakes can be found in Chinese or Japanese supermarkets.

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