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Posts Tagged ‘food photography’

My father is an amazing cook, he’s been a culinary inspiration to me for years. His cooking skills always amazed me, he taught me some tricks that are the direct result of him being an inventor and is the only person who I allow alluring me into eating foods I wouldn’t dare considering.
One of my favorite food games is asking him for one of his recipes. The ritual, is, with slight circumstantial changes, the same every time. It usually takes place over the dinner table, as I am wolfing on one of his delicious creations, I then, with a mouth full of food, ask him for the ingredients and he refuses to tell me what it is that was happening in his pots. then I ask again, and he, once more, says no. Then I give it a few minutes, just staring at him with anticipation. I can tell I’m getting close to breaking him down and so I ask once more. Usually that’s where he tells me what he did and how, unfortunately I can rarely duplicate it.
Last weekend was a whole different story though. I came home to spend the weekend with my family and had the extreme pleasure of watching him in action. We are so far away from each other, that those moments are truly rare and fill me up with joy.
He was slicing beef fillet to about a 1/4 inch thick slices, then in a mortar he made a paste from Rosemary, sea salt, pepper and olive oil. The meat was then rubbed with the paste and set aside.

A heavy grilling pan was then wrapped in foil to avoid a ridiculously dirty stove top and the searing began. The meat goes in for a quick minute or two, on both sides and then comes out. Once all the meat is done he starts the sauce.


Now you might ask yourself why am I about to give out a recipe of a man who so strictly protects them, here’s why:
3 months ago, just as I returned home, my father made this very same dish, he asked that I’ll go get Moscato, and I did, only I got the bubbly version… He made it anyways, using the bubbly wine instead and that would have been it if it wasn’t for the next time he decided to make it, this time using the wine he initially planned on using, the sauce came out different, something was missing, those bubbles did something to the flavor that didn’t come through using the flat wine. Ha, what an incredible turn out to my little mistake!
And so now I claim this recipe to be partially mine, and therefor can share it with the world.
(also, i asked and he said it’s fine…)

Back to the sauce now, on the same cast iron pan he used to sear the meat he now pours the wine, let it release all the flavors and adds butter, cream and lots of black pepper, if salt is needed it will be added a well. The meat goes back in for a quick second and then served.



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Tuesday was Israel’s independence day, a day of joy and celebrations, one that comes immediately after the saddest day of the year, memorial day.
Independence day was always close to my heart, as a child it involved putting flags up on our house and car, performing on the main stage, watching the fireworks, folk dancing and partying into the night. it is also THE day for BBQ, every corner, every tiny piece of grass turns into a spot to place your burning coals and barbecue. it’s a huge meat-fest, all over the place. Since I am not much of a steak eater I made a quick stop in Yafo the day before and bought some veggies, walking through the small market I spotted these beauties. Score!!

To fill the need for some meat on this glorious day of beef eating I stuffed them with rice and beef, some pine nuts and parsley, and spices (salt, pepper, paprika, cumin, cinnamon).
To avoid undercooked rice make sure you cook it beforehand.
the ratio of meat and rice depends on your liking, I used 1lb of ground meat to about 2 cups of cooked rice, 1/2 cup of toasted pine nuts, fried onion and garlic.

Empty the inside of the zucchini with a small sharp knife and a teaspoon, make sure not to cut too deep into the skin, try to leave at least 1/4 – 1/2 an inch of meat on the inside, then stuff them but don’t press it in too much, so it remains airy.

Then place them all in a pot with tomato sauce, start with garlic and onions, add tomatoes, a bay leaf or two, salt, pepper, paprika, cumin, spicy paprika, tomato juice and a little parsley.
bring to a boil, them simmer for about an hour and a half, I sometimes finish it all in the oven for an hour.

Served with some sour cream, Israeli style, thick and full of flavor, and some tasty bread.


There is nothing I like cooking better than stuffed 8 balls. Nothing. Enjoy.

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We are so hungry, driving through Fukuoka looking for a place to eat, we notice a spot that looks like it’s popping, the parking lot is full, there is line inside, this gotta be worth it.

Udon factory, from start to finish, they make the dough, cut the noodles, boil and portion, then you choose your size (Large please!!), get your perfectly soft-boiled egg and pick your deep-fried toppings from the buffet like display. And then you get to eat it. It tasted better than any udon I had before.

 

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It’s 5 am, we have been singing karaoke since 11pm, our voices are done, our eyes are half shut. It’s windy and cold and we really want to stay inside, but we said we are going to do it, so we did.
Tsukiji market is huge, it supplies the majority of the world’s fish and seafood, and though it is fascinating to walk through it and watch the men as they clean and slice, load their carts and speed through the narrow aisles, it also raises some serious questions about regulating fishing in Japan. It takes watching the amount of fish and seafood on display for one to ask themselves how long before there is no more fish to catch? And are we going to stop before it’s too late?
I would be lying if I said I wasn’t standing there mesmerized by the colors and admiring the precise cuts and clean technique of the working, rushing men of Tsukiji.
We spent about an hour and a half walking through and watching, there wasn’t much talking, if anything an occasional wow! or ooohhhh…
Handling fish is definitely an art form, especially when it comes to giant 100-150 lbs tuna, 5 minutes from start to finish, with a knife that is longer then my legs and is sharp as sharp can be, one cut length wise, two cuts to separate the spine, and voila !!!

These are some pictures from the butchering of yellow fin tuna in the biggest fish market in the world.
As my jaw drops in admiration I make a little prayer that these sights won’t be just a tale to tell our kids and grand-kids.

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