Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Photography’ Category

It’s been more than a month that I had 18 of my dearest friends and family gather in my Brooklyn apartment, for an evening of food, wine and lots of laughing.
Passover has always been a very significant holiday to me, and one that I highly favor. It was also my grandmother’s holiday so this year’s celebration was, to me, in her memory.

We started by reading the Haggadah, but didn’t read the whole thing, there was just too much going on and 20 minutes were plenty..

With the help of my good friends, Ben and Greg we worked out quite a feast: to start we had the traditional matzo ball soup, followed by a grouper and flounder ceviche, served on a base of eggplant cream:

Then we served an insane amount of food, fingerling potatoes in duck fat, crispy brussel sprouts, white rice with an accent of wild black rice and nuts, roasted root vegetables, herb roasted chicken and the star of the evening, Ben’s braised leg of lamb served with parsley and horseradish puree.

The best part was the dessert, my sister made, in the spirit of our beloved grandmother, many kinds of fruit and vegetable shaped marzipan, and set up an incredible display, that was as beautiful as it tasted.

And Matt, with the help of Kayla, iced a hand full of hand shaped passover cookies for our enjoyment.

As you can see, I was highly excited for dessert…

This was a very happy passover, Thanks to this lovely NY family I got.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

I came across this interesting looking fruit at the food co-op a few times before, and every time I picked it up and found myself puzzled from its appearance and the simple fact that it came with an instructions page.
Last week I finally decided it was time to give it a try, so I took one home and placed it in a cup, bottom up, allowing it to do its thing.

The monstera deliciosa is native to Mexico and Guatemala, and supposedly tastes like a combination of banana and pineapple. The fruit must ripen and peel itself, as it contain oxalic acid, so you place it in a cup or jar and just wait. A day or two went by and then one morning it happened, the scale looking skin cracked open, exposing a white flash and releasing an addicting tropical scent.

This is the first time I have seen anything like this fruit, and I was fascinated by it. In the course of one day this little tropical monster peeled itself completely, exposing its white moist flesh and shedding, along with its green scales, hundreds of tiny black seeds.

When it was finally done, that evening, it was time to slice it up and see what this fruit is all about. We were all very curious as to how it is going to taste, the internet was telling up it taste a little like banana, pineapple, kiwi, jack fruit and mango… an interesting mix of flavors…

Once slices, it looked a lot like a cross between a corn and a kiwi with a very strong tropical odor.
It was delicious, just as the name suggested, very sweet and very tropical, indeed a mix between a few more familiar flavors with a soft flesh. However after eating a few pieces from it, the mouth starts to tingle and you get that funny feeling that tells you not to over indulge. As the name suggested, once again, this is a monster we are talking about after all.

Read Full Post »

It’s been months that I have been planing on making these cookies. It all started after I had Thini cookies at Sugar-Daddy in Tel Aviv earlier this year. I was talking about making these cookies for so long that it seemed like it wasn’t going to happen.
After looking up recipes online and in my cookbook collection and not coming up with anything that seemed promising, I tried to improvise… The first batch of cookies was too hard, so I added some butter and replaced a 1/3 of the spelt flour with almond meal. And here you go, a winner recipe, the cookies came out tasty and crumbly, perfect served with tea or on their own. So good!
Thini is basically ground up sesame seeds and Silan is a date syrup, the combination of these two flavors is unreal.
First thing is making sure you are using high quality Thini paste, I prefer Thini that comes from the middle east, it just seems to be better than any local brand I tried. The Silan should be as natural as possible, and without preservatives.

1/2 cup raw Thini paste
1/2 cup date syrup
8 tablespoon of butter (1 stick)
1 1/2 cup flour, I used spelt and almond meal, 1 cup spelt and 1/2 almond.
1/4 cup chopped pistachio
cinnamon, cardamon, vanilla and a pinch of salt

Pre-heat the oven to 355 (180 Celsius)
Start by placing the thini and butter in a sauce pan over low heat, mix until well combined.
In a large bowl mix the thini-butter paste with the silan, chopped pistachios, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, a few drops of vanilla extract, 1/2-1 teaspoon of ground cardamon and the salt.
Slowly add the flour and mix by hand until a soft dough is formed.
Using your hands, form small balls and place on a baking pan, since the dough is soft the cookies will spread, so make sure they are spread out.


Bake for 10-12 minutes, just until slightly brown and take out. Let cool before trying to move the cookies or they will fall apart.
The cookies are extremely soft at first but they will harden as they cool down.

Read Full Post »

Its bone marrow time!
About a year and a half ago, just a few days before I started working at The Breslin, I had dinner there with my father. Both of us ordered the bone marrow onion soup. neither of us was overly impressed and then he made a promise, that in due time he will teach me how to make what he was calling “real bone marrow”. The time has finally arrived, and for my farewell meal he shared with me his bone marrow roasting recipe.
Bone marrow is something I was avoiding for years, for obvious reasons, I like to Believe. It’s fatty content always seemed unappealing to me. Then when I finally had some, I wished I have done so years earlier.
When roasted correctly, bone marrow is the perfect companion for a nice slice of bread, scooped out and spread on a toast. finger licking worthy.

Starting by pre-heating your oven to a medium-high heat, place the bones in a baking dish, marrow part up, and sprinkle some sea salt, freshly ground black pepper and paprika.

place them in the oven for about 20 minutes, watching closely to ensure they aren’t going over and melting into oil.
You know they are ready when the bone is nicely colored and the marrow looks like it starting to char.

Read Full Post »

it’s been months since I updated this blog, not because I wasn’t eating but mostly because I haven’t been cooking at all, with an exception of one meal that led to a night of Tequila and booty shaking.
If you know me you know how rear it is for me to go more than a few days without cooking, it’s now getting closer to be two months… but I am still eating, and photographing it !

A recent day trip to Jerusalem will be a good place to start, we made two stops, first at Russel’s Bakery where I spent a few hours shaping loaves and learning a little about the process of bread making that I am so deeply interested in. Then, the Iraqi market where we had some delicious food before buying a ridiculous amount of vegetable, with a clear intention to cook. so far I made one salad consisting of a tomato, a cucumber and a radish…. but it’s only been 3 days so there is still hope.

Russel is a native South African that decide to learn the art of bread making and traveled the word to study recipes and techniques. He opened a small bakery and shop near the Shuke in Jerusalem, and everyday before 4am he starts cutting and shaping, baking and loving his bread. A true artist and an inspiration.

Shaping loaves.
* picture by Yossi Tabul

Russel is working a two hand rolling.

What a way to spend a day off! Thank you Russel for letting me get my hands dirty and play with some walnut dough.

Read Full Post »

On our way from Hiroshima to Kyoto we decided there is no logical reason why we wouldn’t stop in Kobe for lunch. Sure it’s raining and cold, it’s out of our way and the lunch special is more than $50, but it’s Kobe we are talking about, Kobe, as in the place where people massage cows to keep their meat perfectly marbleized. oh,  it sure was…
Our chef started by grilling some garlic on the skillet in front of us, then set up our plates so they were directly on the skillet to keep warm.

Next came the beef, and my, was it beautiful..

Starting by rendering some fat to grease the skillet and slicing the meat into pieces according to fat content, our chef was a skillful and accurate man, and we were salivating with our mouths open. Really.

Since $50 only gets you so little beef we had some tofu and vegetable grilled along side it, as well as some delicious fried rice that was made last, so it fills up only the little spaces in our stomach, those tiny cracks between the chunks of meat.

Both the rice and the sprouts were grilled in some fat, and to add some flavor he used all the access fat that was cut off the meat at the beginning. fried rice with tiny cubes of Kobe beef fat. Delicious!!

This was by far one of the best meals I had in the last month.

Read Full Post »

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »