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Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

Its Shavuot, the holiday that commemorates God giving the Torah to the Israelites, and we celebrate it by wearing all white and eating dairy. That might seem odd, but somewhere, someone, had an argument good enough to make others agree, and therefore I wear white (actually I wore purple) and eat cheese. And I can’t complain, as I LOVE dairy in most of its edible forms.

Earlier this week I visited Liat and was handed a bag full of passion-fruit, different from most fruit, the best passion-fruit are the dark and wrinkly looking ones. I love Passion fruit, and it’s Shavuot, what else was I to do?

Short side story, while visiting Hawaii last year I was introduced to the local version of Passion-fruit, Jamaican Lilikoi, a yellow-orange colored fruit, that looks very much like the familiar passion-fruit, but is much sweeter. During that trip I became slightly obsessed with the idea of topping a cheese cake with this wonderful, delicious, tropical fruit, but that never happened. With the combination of the fruit in my bag and the arriving holiday the outcome was inevitable.

Passion-Cheese cake it is.

The recipe is easy as can be, but it is made with an Israeli soft cheese that doesn’t have an American equivalent… You can buy it in Israeli/Jewish supermarkets if you really wanna give it a go or use kwark or fromage blanc instead.

For the dough base:
1/2 cup (100g) sugar
2 cups (280g) AP flour
3 egg yolks
200g cold butter, diced

mix all ingredients together until a uniform dough is formed, placed in a buttered baking dish and shape to make an even base.

Bake on medium heat (180°c, 350°f) for 30 minutes.
once the dough is baked scrape it with a fork to make crumbs, cool down and place in an air-tight box.

For the cheese cake, mix 500 ml heavy cream and 1/3 cup (70g) sugar whip to form a thick cream, then mix in 500g white cheese (Israeli soft, white cheese, should be drained in a cheese cloth over a bowl, in the fridge, for at least two hours prior to mixing in the cake), and some lemon zest.

once the base is completely cool, pour the cheese mixture over the dough and place in the fridge for at least 4 hours to set.

Before serving let stand in room temp for 15 minutes, then, either sprinkle with the crumbs or top with passion fruit, or berries.

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Tuesday was Israel’s independence day, a day of joy and celebrations, one that comes immediately after the saddest day of the year, memorial day.
Independence day was always close to my heart, as a child it involved putting flags up on our house and car, performing on the main stage, watching the fireworks, folk dancing and partying into the night. it is also THE day for BBQ, every corner, every tiny piece of grass turns into a spot to place your burning coals and barbecue. it’s a huge meat-fest, all over the place. Since I am not much of a steak eater I made a quick stop in Yafo the day before and bought some veggies, walking through the small market I spotted these beauties. Score!!

To fill the need for some meat on this glorious day of beef eating I stuffed them with rice and beef, some pine nuts and parsley, and spices (salt, pepper, paprika, cumin, cinnamon).
To avoid undercooked rice make sure you cook it beforehand.
the ratio of meat and rice depends on your liking, I used 1lb of ground meat to about 2 cups of cooked rice, 1/2 cup of toasted pine nuts, fried onion and garlic.

Empty the inside of the zucchini with a small sharp knife and a teaspoon, make sure not to cut too deep into the skin, try to leave at least 1/4 – 1/2 an inch of meat on the inside, then stuff them but don’t press it in too much, so it remains airy.

Then place them all in a pot with tomato sauce, start with garlic and onions, add tomatoes, a bay leaf or two, salt, pepper, paprika, cumin, spicy paprika, tomato juice and a little parsley.
bring to a boil, them simmer for about an hour and a half, I sometimes finish it all in the oven for an hour.

Served with some sour cream, Israeli style, thick and full of flavor, and some tasty bread.


There is nothing I like cooking better than stuffed 8 balls. Nothing. Enjoy.

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it’s been months since I updated this blog, not because I wasn’t eating but mostly because I haven’t been cooking at all, with an exception of one meal that led to a night of Tequila and booty shaking.
If you know me you know how rear it is for me to go more than a few days without cooking, it’s now getting closer to be two months… but I am still eating, and photographing it !

A recent day trip to Jerusalem will be a good place to start, we made two stops, first at Russel’s Bakery where I spent a few hours shaping loaves and learning a little about the process of bread making that I am so deeply interested in. Then, the Iraqi market where we had some delicious food before buying a ridiculous amount of vegetable, with a clear intention to cook. so far I made one salad consisting of a tomato, a cucumber and a radish…. but it’s only been 3 days so there is still hope.

Russel is a native South African that decide to learn the art of bread making and traveled the word to study recipes and techniques. He opened a small bakery and shop near the Shuke in Jerusalem, and everyday before 4am he starts cutting and shaping, baking and loving his bread. A true artist and an inspiration.

Shaping loaves.
* picture by Yossi Tabul

Russel is working a two hand rolling.

What a way to spend a day off! Thank you Russel for letting me get my hands dirty and play with some walnut dough.

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On our way from Hiroshima to Kyoto we decided there is no logical reason why we wouldn’t stop in Kobe for lunch. Sure it’s raining and cold, it’s out of our way and the lunch special is more than $50, but it’s Kobe we are talking about, Kobe, as in the place where people massage cows to keep their meat perfectly marbleized. oh,  it sure was…
Our chef started by grilling some garlic on the skillet in front of us, then set up our plates so they were directly on the skillet to keep warm.

Next came the beef, and my, was it beautiful..

Starting by rendering some fat to grease the skillet and slicing the meat into pieces according to fat content, our chef was a skillful and accurate man, and we were salivating with our mouths open. Really.

Since $50 only gets you so little beef we had some tofu and vegetable grilled along side it, as well as some delicious fried rice that was made last, so it fills up only the little spaces in our stomach, those tiny cracks between the chunks of meat.

Both the rice and the sprouts were grilled in some fat, and to add some flavor he used all the access fat that was cut off the meat at the beginning. fried rice with tiny cubes of Kobe beef fat. Delicious!!

This was by far one of the best meals I had in the last month.

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While in Hiroshima we had to try the local specialty, Okonomiyaki. It starts as a crepe with a mountain of veggies and some meat on top, the vegetable slowly shrinks and then it’s flipped and placed on a bed of noodles, then an egg and to finish it up, the special home-made sauce.

Even better than the end result was sitting down to watch the long process of preparing this delicious food.

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We are so hungry, driving through Fukuoka looking for a place to eat, we notice a spot that looks like it’s popping, the parking lot is full, there is line inside, this gotta be worth it.

Udon factory, from start to finish, they make the dough, cut the noodles, boil and portion, then you choose your size (Large please!!), get your perfectly soft-boiled egg and pick your deep-fried toppings from the buffet like display. And then you get to eat it. It tasted better than any udon I had before.

 

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